Norway’s Redchat Defies Evolutionary Speciation

Redchat bird Norway artwork

What exactly is a species?

by James J. S. Johnson

When investigating true-vs.-false controversies, words are very important. Yet Christians sometimes unintentionally perpetuate false teachings by using misleading terms that accommodate evolutionary assumptions. This is what law courts call confusion of issues, a truth-interference problem so serious that trial judges, invoking Evidence Rule 403, ban such confusing terminology when admitting trial evidence.

For example, the origin of species is a confusing topic. What exactly is a species? How can we properly analyze and discuss our origins if the words we use mean different things to different people? Consider this approach by Wikipedia, the multi-anonymous online encyclopedia that institutionally assumes evolution is scientific:

A species is often defined as the largest group of organisms in which any two individuals of the appropriate sexes or mating types can produce fertile offspring, typically by sexual reproduction.


Members of a species breed within the same species. So far so good. But then Wikipedia gives it a Darwinian origin-of-species spin:

The evolutionary process by which biological populations evolve to become distinct or reproductively isolated as species is called speciation….Speciation depends on a measure of reproductive isolation, a reduced gene flow. This occurs most easily in allopatric speciation, where populations are separated geographically and can diverge gradually as mutations accumulate.

So, the development of distinct, separate species is ground zero for the advancement of evolution. But this evolution-assuming speciation concept of gene pool split-offs due to geographic isolation, etc., has a recurring real-world problem—hybridization. Animals that are supposedly traveling on different branches of the same evolutionary tree shouldn’t be able to breed…but some do.

For example, in 2013, Norwegian bird-banders caught a surprise one day, a never-before-seen little bird now called a rødskvett (redchat, literally “red splash”)…

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image credit: Artwork from photo by Albert Burgas