Star and Planetary Formation

All the stars

Creation Perspective

by Brian Mariani and others

In order for stars to start forming, there must be gas clouds that can be compressed. The possibilities for compression can be:

  • a nearby supernova (exploding star),
  • dust grains from a supernova that cool and compress the gas cloud,
  • colliding gas clouds, like galaxies colliding,
  • black holes, which may emit jets of high-speed material that will compress the gas cloud, or
  • radiation from other nearby stars may compress the gas cloud.

In each of those possibilities, “they all require stars to exist before more stars can be made.” “First of all, if the collapsing cloud theory can’t even explain the sun alone, then it is doomed from the start. To form the sun, or any star, a cloud must be dense enough to collapse and compress the interior so that it becomes hot enough for nuclear fusion to start.” “Interstellar gas clouds are too large and diffuse for gravity to overcome gas pressure. So they won’t collapse and form stars – they’ll disperse instead.”

In each of those possibilities, “they all require stars to exist before more stars can be made.” “First of all, if the collapsing cloud theory can’t even explain the sun alone, then it is doomed from the start. To form the sun, or any star, a cloud must be dense enough to collapse and compress the interior so that it becomes hot enough for nuclear fusion to start.” “Interstellar gas clouds are too large and diffuse for gravity to overcome gas pressure. So they won’t collapse and form stars – they’ll disperse instead.” “The origin of stars represents one of the most fundamental unsolved problems of contemporary astrophysics.” “There are so many uncertainties in this picture that at present we do not really have a theory of star formation.” “We’re starting from a shaky foundation…we don’t understand how a single star forms, yet we want to understand how 10 billion stars form.”…

CLICK THIS LINK TO READ THE FULL ARTICLE

image credit: NASA